Shloshim: The Hebrew word for 30, referring to the 30 days following the burial.


Shloshim: The Hebrew word for 30, referring to the 30 days following the burial.

After shiva, some of the restrictions begin to ease as the mourner slowly returns to everyday routines. Mourners tend to return to work and daily tasks as they are ready and able. They continue to attend minyan to recite Mourner’s Kaddish, they do not shave or cut their hair, and do not listen to music or go to live performances.

Traditionally, at the end of shloshim, those mourning the loss of a spouse, sibling, or child would cease mourning practices, including reciting the Mourner’s Kaddish; however, many mourners chose to continue these practices for the full 11 months. Those mourning parents traditionally recite Kaddish for the full 11 months.

Some mark the end of shloshim with an aliyah on Shabbat and/or a Jewish study in honor of their loved one. The unveiling of the headstone may happen at any point after the conclusion of shloshim, though this tends to take place around the anniversary of death.